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Study Guide Answers

1.     When was the last time you became extremely angry?  Who or what caused that anger? Looking back at that incident, what do you think was your first emotional reaction to the situation?  How might have ensuing events differed if you had dealt with your original emotion instead of funneling that energy into anger?
     Discussion.
2.     Have you ever had a boss or other authority figure unload his/her anger upon you over something that you did not think was so important as to warrant that kind of response? Look at the confrontation from the other persons viewpoint.  Why do you think that person acted as he or she did? What can you do to minimize your chances for such an encounter in the future?  Did your reaction at that time increase or decrease the anger?  What different strategies might you try?
     Discussion.
3.     How do you help friends and acquaintances handle upsetting emotional situations?  Aside from sympathy and humor, what are some other techniques that could help to calm a friend whom someone else has made angry?
     Discussion.
4.     Confrontational situations are often said to trigger a fight or flight syndrome.  How does this reference to the adrenalin rush from a highly emotional situation reflect the idea that anger is a secondary emotion?
     Discussion.
5.     Elementary school students have recess periods during which they can burn off excess energy.  Except for physical education classes, students in the upper grades or in college have no specific time set aside for exercise.  How could this lack of physical activity contribute to emotional outbursts? What are some of your favorite ways to constructively channel emotional energy?
     Discussion.
6.     Try keeping an anger journal and record any events that make you angry.  Every two weeks, analyze the record to see if there is a pattern. You may need to avoid certain people or situations in order to better manage anger.
     Project.
7.     Consider how giving in to anger means that you have (at least partially) accepted somebody elses negative judgment about you.  Examine situations where you have lost your temper and determine what negative idea the other person had about you.
     Discussion.
8.     Maintaining a positive self-image can be difficult when others treat you badly.  How do you reassert your own self-worth without sparking an angry confrontation?
     Discussion.
© Educational Video Network, Inc. 2005 - www.evndirect.com
Your leading source for curriculum-based educational videos and DVDs.